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short sale - LA Digs - Northeast LA Real Estate Blog

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LA Digs - Northeast LA Real Estate Blog

Welcome to LA Digs, the real estate and Northeast Los Angeles community blog written by Realtors Tracy King and Keely Myres.

Here, we share tips, market updates, and local news bits to keep you informed on what's happening in Northeast Los Angeles and the surrounding neighborhoods. Read on to learn about the latest in your neighborhood!

Just Sold! 1051 Dexter Street, Highland Park

1051 Dexter StreetJust sold! 1051 Dexter Street is a short sale (they can be done!) that we brought on the market back in January, and finally closed escrow on May 27! The list price was $349,000 and we closed at $371,000.

1051 Dexter Street Living RoomThis is a house that has a lot of potential - built in 1921, it definitely needed some updating and cosmetic work, but the sellers had done some major upgrades, including foundation, front retaining wall, chimney and fireplace replaced and rebuilt in 2007, rewired electrical with upgraded circuits, and new floor tile in the kitchen and bath.

1051 Dexter Street View

The best part of this house (in my opinion) was the terraced yard, with fantastic mountain views.

Additional Details:
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
864 SF on a 6,400 SF Lot
Bonus room above the one-car garage

If you would like additional information on how a short sale works and what is involved, give me a call at 323.243.1234. I am a Certified Distressed Property Expert (CDPE) and can you walk you through the process!

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Ask Tracy: What is Fannie Mae HomePath?

Dear Tracy,

Every now and then when perusing the homes for sale in the area I’d like to live in, I see a description that states it is a Fannie Mae HomePath property.

What exactly does this mean?  Does it make the buying process any different?

Thanks,

Home buyer

When a property is a HomePath property it means that it is (a) a bank-owned home owned by Fannie Mae, and, (b) the buyer of the property is eligible for the Fannie Mae HomePath mortgage program.

As you may know, Fannie Mae is the largest lender in the United States.  Fannie Mae currently has thousands and thousands of homes on their books due to the large number of recent foreclosures.  In an effort to help banks liquidate their Fannie Mae REO inventory, Fannie Mae came up with the HomePath program.

The HomePath program gives lenders and buyers less stringent finance requirements, which is great because more buyers can actually qualify for a loan.  Another great thing – you can get a HomePath mortgage for owner-occupied OR investment properties.  Fannie Mae also has a HomePath renovation financing program for those distressed properties that need a little help before they’re ready to be lived in.

Going the HomePath route makes the home buying process different for a few reasons:

  1. No appraisal is required.

  2. You can make a down payment of as little as 3% of the purchase price.

  3. No mortgage insurance is required (therefore, less up-front cash from buyers and lower monthly payments).

  4. Credit score requirements are more flexible.


So, the million dollar question – why would a lender agree to such a loan?

Well, Fannie Mae is offering a couple of incentives to lenders who process these loans.  First, loans can be sold back to Fannie Mae, so lenders aren’t holding the loans in their own portfolios.  Second, the more loans a lender makes, the more fees it generates for originating and servicing the loans.

I know what your next question will be – with all the cash investors snatching up distressed properties in the area, is it even possible to get one of these properties with a HomePath loan?

I’m not going to tell you that it will be easy, a lot of the time if a bank can get cash, they’ll take it.  But!  We are actually in escrow on a HomePath property and, except for a delay in opening escrow because it has to go through the Fannie Mae channels, everything is going smoothly so far (knock on wood).

My big advice for going into escrow on HomePath properties is to fully exercise your due diligence – get that property inspected thoroughly!  These banks don’t know a lot of the details on the condition of the property, and they rarely will do repairs before the close of escrow.  So do your homework and really understand what you’re getting into.

For more information and a database of HomePath eligible homes, visit www.homepath.com.
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